A Travellerspoint blog

Visitors from home...

Showing off the area...

This week we were joined by Mike and Cathy Halliwushka who are visiting from Ottawa to see what this area of the Yucatan is like.

This gives us the excuse to do a few more of the "touristy" things and on Monday we got together with some neigbours and all went to Sotuta de Peon, the henequén plantation and hacienda.
The landmark Sotuta de Peón is a restoration project located in the heart of the ancient henequén zone in the state of Yucatan and gives a true glimpse of what was once a fully operational Henequen Hacienda in the grand style and tradition of this period. This Hacienda was purchased with the dream of bringing back to life the golden years of the henequén. Over the past 25 years the owners have painstakingly searched abandoned haciendas for machine parts, tracks, trucks and other items of historical importance in order to save them from the complete destruction of time.
hacienda veranda

hacienda veranda


Henequen is a plant in the agave family and looks similar until you see the serrated edges of the leave and the hard spines on the tip of each leaf. The leaves are cut, only a certain number off each plant at any given time, then flattened and processed to get the fibre which is then twisted into rope.
After touring the hacienda, we were taken to see the processing part of the plantation which was very noisy...but interesting...pictures attached.
our neighbour Ron in action

our neighbour Ron in action

drying henequen fibre

drying henequen fibre

henequen leaves heading up

henequen leaves heading up

crushing the leaves

crushing the leaves


the result of pressure

the result of pressure


so sharp

so sharp

We then boarded flat bed carts, thankfully with cushions, and were pulled, by horse, down a narrow gauge rail through the henequen fields and to a cenote. The cenote had a set of cement steps, making it easy to get down in to, but unlike others we have been in, it was rather dark which made it hard to take pictures. However, the fresh cenote water was very refreshing and we floated around for a good while. It was Cathy's first time in a cenote and she was somewhat apprehensive, but she ended up really enjoying the experience!
our steed in the henequen field

our steed in the henequen field

We have been doing more walking around Merida...every time we see things we hadn't before. Some window, doors, door knockers, people....so many pictures...so little space!
door

door

Santa Ana church

Santa Ana church

paintwork in progress

paintwork in progress

Merida street sign

Merida street sign

trim on an old window

trim on an old window

ornate door knocker

ornate door knocker


fun Piñatas

fun Piñatas


old Mayan house in centro

old Mayan house in centro

lovely pasta tiles

lovely pasta tiles


Andrea even tried her hand at using a punch needle....the old gentleman made it look so easy...we shall see.
Andrea learning to use the punch needle

Andrea learning to use the punch needle


Merida street art

Merida street art

ornate Merida house

ornate Merida house

One of the other fun activities this week was a House Tours in Merida.
There are two house tour activities in Merida at present, one on Wednesday (run as a business) and the other on Tuesday (run by the Merida English Library or MEL as it is called). The proceeds of the MEL tour (200 pesos or about 18.00) go towards library programs and books, so we decided to support that one. Our tour guide Brent gave us a mini history lesson of the Merida area before starting out, which was very educational. To back up a bit.....I had wondered why some the chunks of clay roof tiles I had picked up on the beach had the words "Marseilles" written on them...I found out why.
Back in the day when the Yucatan was the largest producer of sisal rope (from the henequen plant) , the sisal rope was shipped from the port of Sisal to France and Spain. On the return journeys, the ships needed ballast so it was decided to load them with pasta tiles and clay roof tiles, hense the wonderful floors and roofs in the Merida area. On the tour, we visited four houses, all lovingly restored with back gardens and pools. We were told by each owner that they rarely use the front part of the house, but instead take their friends directly through to the "back". It was difficult to take good shots as our group was rather large, but the houses were stunning.
at the library

at the library

old doors in renovated house

old doors in renovated house

Cathy in the kitchen

Cathy in the kitchen

back patio

back patio


hanging bed

hanging bed

Andrea and art deco type door

Andrea and art deco type door

Cathy and door

Cathy and door


Posing by a wonderful window

Posing by a wonderful window

This cute picture was taken on our way back from dinner in Chicxulub.....he was waiting so patiently for his owner who was in the store, then they drove off....
dog days in Chicxulub

dog days in Chicxulub

Posted by hermanita 15:49 Archived in Mexico Tagged chicxulub

Email this entryFacebookStumbleUpon

Table of contents

Comments

what a great blogger you are ! Your pics show you to be tanned and looking radiant ! Miss you, Chica hi Andrea. Xxxxx Ang willie and Ray

by angie

Fantastic week, very cultural and educational with great hosts and great friends!

by Cathy Halliwushka

Comments on this blog entry are now closed to non-Travellerspoint members. You can still leave a comment if you are a member of Travellerspoint.

Enter your Travellerspoint login details below

( What's this? )

If you aren't a member of Travellerspoint yet, you can join for free.

Join Travellerspoint